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Management Systems


Congestion Management

Congestion Management

The purpose of the Old Colony Congestion Management Process (CMP) is to identify congested locations; determine the causes of congestion; develop alternative strategies to mitigate congestion; evaluate the potential of different mitigation strategies; propose alternative strategies that best address the causes and impacts of congestion; and track and evaluate the impact of previously implemented congestion management strategies. The Old Colony CMP is intended to be an integral part of the metropolitan planning process, rather than a stand-alone process or system. Towards this end, OCPC staff engage in data collection, corridor studies, travel time analysis, congestion simulation and the analysis of transit data.

Pavement Management

Pavement Management

The Pavement Management System (PMS) for federal-aid eligible roads was developed in conformance with federal guidelines initiated by the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA), the precursor to TEA-21 and SAFETEA-LU. These federal aid eligible roads fall into two main funding categories; the Surface Transportation Program (STP) and the National Highway System (NHS). The PMS involves evaluating sections of federally-aided roadway for specific deterioration and hazard criteria, and using these field evaluations to calculate a Pavement Condition Index (PCI) score using pavement management software. The PCI score determines the overall condition of the roadway: Excellent (PCI 95 or higher), Good (PCI 94-85), Fair (PCI 84-65), and Poor (PCI 64 or lower). Based on the PCI, Road Manager derives recommended levels of repair for the roadway, along with the estimated cost for repair.

Safety Management

Safety Management

The Safety Management System consists of a systematic process that has the goal of reducing the number of and severity of traffic crashes on public roads. Recommended actions include providing information for selecting and implementing effective safety strategies and projects. All opportunities to improve roadway safety are identified, considered, and implemented in all phases of highway planning, design, construction, maintenance, and operation. The safety management system incorporates roadway, human and vehicle safety elements. Recommendations for safety improvements are derived from recent corridor and bottleneck studies, local highway technical assistance studies, and road safety audits. A listing of the top 100 most hazardous intersections and the most hazardous highway interchanges is produced each year using updated crash information.